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7 ways Brazilian Jiu-jitsu improves health

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is a martial art that focuses on grappling and ground fighting techniques. It is also referred to as Gracie Jiu-Jitsu. Those learning its techniques are taught how to gain a dominant position over the opponent with the help of techniques such as chokeholds, joint-locks and compression locks. The art was derived from early 20th century Kodokan Judo, which descends from Japanese Jujutsu. This martial art has gained popularity in recent years, making it far easier to find classes than in the past.

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is a great method of self defense, and has been especially recommended for women. Since women who are attacked are most often thrown to the ground, the techniques taught in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu are particularly effective in helping women learn to fight from this submissive position. In addition, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is thought to be particularly effective for women because it does not require a lot of size or strength to be used effectively. However, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu offers benefits to your health, too. Here are some ways practicing Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu can help you.

1. It increases endurance – You can begin practicing Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu at any fitness level. However, over time, you’ll find your endurance increases because of the requirements of the sport.

2. It increases flexibility- – Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu’s moves will require you to move in ways that are unfamiliar, at first. However, as the moves become easier, you’ll find that you’ve increased your overall flexibility.

3. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu builds muscle – Over time, even without weight training, you’ll find that your muscle tone and muscle mass have increased.

4. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu increases your aerobic capacity – This is a great workout – and you’ll find that you have greater aerobic capacity after a time. You’ll likely lose a few pounds, too, especially if you practice another aerobic exercise, like running, biking or swimming, on your off days.

5. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu increases your confidence level – The knowledge that you can defend yourself against an opponent is very powerful. When we believe our bodies are strong, we feel better physically and mentally.

6. Practicing Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu reduces stress – Like any physically challenging exercise, practicing Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is a great way to reduce stress by taking out your frustrations on your opponent – or just on a practice bag. You’ll find you’re more relaxed and sleep better.

7. Jiu-Jitsu improves your focus and concentration – This sport requires mental concentration as you anticipate your opponent’s next move and formulate your own plan for defense and attack. This forced concentration helps you be better able to focus your mind during practice – and for other tasks, as well.

As you can see, Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is a great all around sport. You’ll increase your fitness level and reduce your stress level. And, perhaps most importantly, you’ll gain the skills to protect yourself in the event of an attack, and the confidence that goes along with the knowledge that you are capable of self defense. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu classes are easier than ever to find – so go out and sign up for one today!

Congrats Marc Stevens, James Friar, and Bill Garrett at 2010 NAGA MOHEGAN SUN CHAMPIONSHIPS

Marc Stevens Winning his Superfight

James Friar winning 1st place Blue Belt

Congrats to all Tai Kai and Jiu Jitsu Nation students that competed at the 2010 NAGA Mohegan Sun Grappling Championships

1) Marc Stevens won his superfight 8-0 totally dominating his opponent

2) Bill Garrett for taking 1st Place Blue Belt and 3rd Place NO GI Advanced

3) James Friar for taking 1st place Blue Belt and 2nd place NO Gi Advanced losing in the finals to Renzo Gracie Black Belt and TUF veteran Dan Simmler

BJJ Black Belt Roy Harris thoughts on Purple and Brown Belt Progression

Purple Belt

This is the belt of momentum and combinations. This is the belt level where the amount of energy you expend to accomplish a specific task should be considerably lower than it was when you were a white belt. Your game should have a certain amount of grace and finesse to it. Your game should not have rely on speed, power and explosiveness to get you into positions or out of positions. Your repertoire of techniques should be very high. However, you should begin to focus your training on your depth of knowledge. The white and blue belts are the belts where you accumulate techniques. The purple belt is the first belt where you must begin to refine your techniques. It is also the belt where you learn to put the basic techniques together into various two technique and three technique combinations, with the use of momentum.

Because you become more reliant upon combinations and momentum, the amount of speed and power required to effect your technique decreases. This is not something a white or blue belt can do just yet because of their limited amount of knowledge and experience.

As a purple belt, you must begin to focus your training on the use momentum. You must train your entire body to FEEL momentum. Up until this point in time, most everything was visual. You must develop a high level of sensitivity so that you can flow with your opponent instead of forcing techniques with speed and power, especially when you grappled people who are much bigger and stronger than you are. Pushing an opponent’s dead weight around is exhausting if you do not have a firm foundation in escapes and positioning. You will need to learn to use the momentum that your opponent gives to you, as well as create momentum when his body is not in motion. Momentum will help you to lower the amount of strength you use to perform your techniques.

Your training should also begin to use the basic techniques together into two, three and sometimes five technique combinations. Notice I said “basic” techniques. The purple belt mentality is very different from the white and blue belt mentality. White and blue belts think the answer to their problems is learning more techniques. The purple belt thinks to himself: “I need to refine the techniques I already know and then learn how to reflexively put the appropriate techniques together into flowing combinations.” For example, when I first learned the triangle, I thought it was just a matter of throwing my legs over their head and shoulder and squeezing my legs together. Then as I matured in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, I noticed that there were a specific set of components that made up the technique (20 to be exact!). Then, I noticed that these components could be broken down even further into sub-categories. Now (as a black belt), the triangle is no longer a simple technique with three or four movements. It is now a myriad of over twenty (20) different (and subtle) moving parts that must be put together in a specific order so they can all work together towards one common goal: apply pressure to the neck. Once I had mastered the triangle, I needed to put it together with other basic techniques like the arm lock, the hip bump, the sweep, the kimura, a knee lock, etc. Knowing how to combine the triangle with other basic techniques was very important to my development in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu! Once I could combine techniques together and use them in conjunction with momentum, I now felt ready to take on the world. I’ve noticed the same in many students, both in seminars, at my school and other schools.

The purple belt’s mind set should be on the refinement of his current knowledge and the use of momentum and combinations. The purple belt is able to do this because he already has a wide base of knowledge in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. I know that white and blue belts want to learn how to do this, but they simply aren’t ready for it just yet.

This mindset, along with some rapidly developing skills by the purple belts usually sets the stage for some highly charged matches, especially amongst new purple belts. Why? Because the some of the “veteran” blue belts want to make a purple belt tap. Plus, a number of students who get their purple belts go through a period which I call “testing their wares.” They want to see just how they compare to the older, more experienced purple belts, especially those who are about to be promoted to brown belt.

Brown Belt

This is the belt of mastery of ALL the basics and something I call “at-will grappling.” This is also the belt where submissions play a big part in the training. When I decide that someone is about ready for their brown belt, I tell them in advance that they are about 9 months to a year away from their brown belt. I give them a schedule of tasks that I want them to work on.

First, they must master each and every escape. I want them to be able to escape every position with the use of their hands AND without the use of their hands (they must know how to push and pull, lift and lower with every portion of their anatomy.). I want them to be able to hold other students down with their hands and without their hands. I want to see them use all of the basic techniques in three and five technique combinations. I also want them to begin to refine their submissions. This is where I begin to use the “at-will grappling” training method. I will tell the student, “for the next thirty days, all I want you to do is apply straight arm locks when you grapple with the other students. No chokes or leg locks. Just arm locks.” Then, a month later, I will tell them, “for the next month, all I want you to do are leg locks. Then a month later, I will tell them to choke the other students. So, for each month, they have been given a specific task to master. Because they tell the other students, “All I am going to do is arm lock you today,” the student knows what the purple belt is going for. This forces the student to be creative in setting up the arm lock because his opponent knows that he will not try a different submission. Setting up an opponent is a difficult task, however, it is one that needs to be learned at this belt level. (I know the lower belt levels want to learn this stuff, but again, they are simply not ready for it.)

Once the student has gotten pretty good at arm locks, leg locks or choke, I will have him narrow the scope of his training. Now, he must focus on one specific limb. I will tell him, “for the next month, all I want you to do is arm lock your opponent’s left arm.” This really forces the student to develop a multiplicity of ways to enter into the straight arm lock on his opponent’s left arm. The student has the confidence to go for all of these submissions because he has a foundation in positional escapes and positional dominance. If he did not have this foundation, he would be timid to go for the submission because he would not want to end up on the bottom again. However, because he can easily escape from any position, and because he can readily hold down and control his opponent, he can repeatedly try for these submissions time and time again! This is why I do not place a lot of emphasis on submissions until the purple or brown belt levels. Position and control are the most important tools to develop at first.

Once a student has a firm grip on the mastery of his basics, I will promote him to brown belt. Once he has been promoted to brown belt, he must continue to refine his game. He must seek out his weak areas and focus on them. He must also find his strengths and focus on them for an extended period of time because these will define his character as a black belt. Most black belts have a specialty. Some are good at throws. Others are good at collar chokes. I happen to be good at leg locks. I want my brown belts to find their sweet spot and train it like crazy!

Training Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and Mixed Martial Arts burns over 800 calories a workout.

Most people are overweight and out of shape. Going to the gym is not an option for many, since the training is unsupervised. Motivation is really needed when you are with a group of people and have a common purpose to what you want to achieve.

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu and MMA are really good martial arts to work out to. Since the current craze of the UFC, MMA has been a very popular sport among people who are interested in fighting. While you are learning the martial arts, you will be burning a tremendous amount of calories per hour. Most people really don’t believe it till they experience it firsthand. Imagine if you are using every muscle in your body to attack and defend against your opponent. In most sports, you will only use 1 body segment at a time. For instance, in lifting weight, you would be only using your arms or legs. In Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, you will be using all of your body to control your opponent against any moves, and this what gets the whole body involved.

In MMA, you are learning to strike, kick, and clinch. Most of the calories are burned when you are clinching your opponent since you have to involve your whole body. This is why you rarely, ir never, see any mixed martial artist that is out of shape. Most have to use so many calories to involve themselves in the sparring session.

Training in Brazilian Jiu Jitsu will help you get fit, as well as, learn great self-defense. In this art, you are using every muscle in your body, and with that in mind, you can burn up to 800 calories per hour. More than any workout at any gym.

This art requires one to learn to defend the guard, pass the guard, and learning submissions. Submissions only comes when one understands the control one should have over their opponent. It is essential to stabilize the other opponent before applying the submission, otherwise the opponent will escape and you will have to start again.

Also, one has to be careful since there are so many moves with Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. One can get confused, and pay attention to the basics which will carry them through to the next level. Many of the successful MMA fighters in the world started in Jiu Jitsu, and use that as their core martial art.

Learning the martial art is something special, and something that everyone should look into. Take care in evaluating an academy, and pick your programs wisely. Most schools are not supervised well, and you have to look at how they treat their students, their peers, and how they clean their school.
Look at the programs and start with something that is basic. Diving into an advanced program will only make you quit early and you will never give yourself a chance to participate in the martial arts.
Finding an instructor is also important, and paramount in furthering your skill in the world of the martial arts.

Thursday 9/2/2010 Techniques

I want to start listing techniques as we do them in class. I meant to take a video of these but forgot so next time.

All the techniques were from our opponent in the turtle position

1) We did a turnover to get side control on our opponent
2) We did a spinning collar choke from the turtle
3) We did a rolling armbar from the turtle

I plan on listing future class techniques but next time with video